The good girls revolt : how the women of Newsweek sued their bosses and changed the workplace
(Book)

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Published
New York : PublicAffairs, 2016.
ISBN
9781610397469, 1610397460
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LocationCall NumberStatus
Downers Grove Public Library - 2nd Floor - Adult331.4 POVOn Shelf

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Format
Book
Edition
First paperback edition.
Physical Desc
xxii, 264 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 21 cm
Language
English
ISBN
9781610397469, 1610397460

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 237-238) and index.
Description
It was the 1960s -- a time of economic boom and social strife. Young women poured into the workplace, but the "Help Wanted" ads were segregated by gender and the "Mad Men" office culture was rife with sexual stereotyping and discrimination. Lynn Povich was one of the lucky ones, landing a job at Newsweek, renowned for its cutting-edge coverage of civil rights and the "Swinging Sixties." Nora Ephron, Jane Bryant Quinn, Ellen Goodman, and Susan Brownmiller all started there as well. It was a top-notch job -- for a girl -- at an exciting place. But it was a dead end. Women researchers sometimes became reporters, rarely writers, and never editors. Any aspiring female journalist was told, "If you want to be a writer, go somewhere else." On March 16, 1970, the day Newsweek published a cover story on the fledgling feminist movement entitled "Women in Revolt," forty-six Newsweek women charged the magazine with discrimination in hiring and promotion. It was the first female class action lawsuit -- the first by women journalists -- and it inspired other women in the media to quickly follow suit. Lynn Povich was one of the ringleaders. In The Good Girls Revolt, she tells the story of this dramatic turning point through the lives of several participants. She shows how personal experiences and cultural shifts led a group of well-mannered, largely apolitical women, raised in the 1940s and 1950s, to challenge their bosses -- and what happened after they did. For many, filing the suit was a radicalizing act that empowered them to "find themselves" and fight back. Others lost their way amid opportunities, pressures, discouragements, and hostilities they weren't prepared to navigate. This book also explores why changes in the law didn't solve everything. Through the lives of young female journalists at Newsweek today, Lynn Povich shows what has -- and hasn't -- changed in the workplace.

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Citations

APA Citation, 7th Edition (style guide)

Povich, L. (2016). The good girls revolt: how the women of Newsweek sued their bosses and changed the workplace (First paperback edition.). PublicAffairs.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Povich, Lynn. 2016. The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued Their Bosses and Changed the Workplace. New York: PublicAffairs.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities (Notes and Bibliography) Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Povich, Lynn. The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued Their Bosses and Changed the Workplace New York: PublicAffairs, 2016.

MLA Citation, 9th Edition (style guide)

Povich, Lynn. The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued Their Bosses and Changed the Workplace First paperback edition., PublicAffairs, 2016.

Note! Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy. Citation formats are based on standards as of August 2021.

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